Birth Control and Sexual Health: The Methods You Should Know About

Choosing a birth control method isn't easy. That's why we've got you covered with stats, studies, and the latest info on different forms of contraceptives. We're also all over the latest in women's reproductive rights, so you always know where you stand with your birth control access and coverage.

Among the many options you have when it comes to sex—from fancy lube to flavored condoms to crazy positions—choosing the right birth control for you is the most important decision you can make. Safe sex is hot sex, peeps. Debby Herbenick, PhD, MPH and co-director of Indiana University’s Center for Sexual Health Promotion, walks us through 11 options, with effectiveness percentages courtesy of Planned Parenthood. 


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COMMENT
Really you guys put the "The Pull-Out" Method as a form of birth control? Not only does it not protect you from std's but it is also the worst method to use and I wouldn't suggest this method to anybody. There is no correct way to do this method and if this is the only form of "birth control" a person is able to use then there is no way that person should be having sex in the first place.

Going On and Off The Pill Can Make You Less Attracted to Your Partner

A study in the journal Psychological Science reports that either starting or stopping oral contraception while you're in a relationship can affect the sex drive you feel for your partner (via TIME).

The most sexually satisfied women, according to the data collected from 365 heterosexual couples, were those who started taking the pill before they met their partner and are still on it, and women who never started taking it in the first place.

The study notes that hormonal changes from starting or stopping birth control can alter women's opinions of their partner's looks — apparently if a woman who is on the pill stops taking it, she's more likely to find her partner less attractive than she did while she was on the pill.

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Sexual Health: How do I choose the perfect Pill?

Not all Pills are created equal. Find the one that will suit your situation - There are more than 35 different oral contraceptives on the market, so finding the right one can seem like mission impossible. Deciding may involve some trial and error since women react differently to various types (and even brands), says Andrew M. Kaunitz, M.D., professor and assistant chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Florida Health Science Center at Jacksonville. Here, we help you get a head start:

Monophasic.

If you're plagued by the hormonal ups and downs of PMS, you may benefit from monophasic pills. These oral contraceptives contain the same daily dosage of the hormones estrogen and progestin in each Pill.

Triphasic. 

This type may have fewer side effects than other types because it varies the dosage of progestin and estrogen in three phases over the course of your cycle (hence the reason there are often four different colored pills in the pack, including the placebos). Triphasics may also help minimize irregular bleeding.

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The Minipill. 

This Pill contains only progestin, making it a good alternative if you have adverse reactions to estrogen (for example, if you get migraine headaches or have a history of blood clots or high blood pressure). This type has been known to cause breakthrough bleeding in some women, especially if it's not taken at the same time every day.

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How Effective Is Birth Control - Effectiveness of Birth Control Options

How Effective is Birth Control? An 11-Method Breakdown"
Among the many options you have when it comes to sex; from fancy lube to flavored condoms to crazy positions; choosing the right birth control for you is the most important decision you can make. Safe sex is hot sex, peeps. Indiana University Center for Sexual Health Promotion, walks us through 11 options, with effectiveness percentages courtesy of Planned Parenthood.

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Hormone Pills

"What it is: Pills taken daily to prevent pregnancy.
How it works: Hormonal pills (containing progestin and estrogen) stop ovulation.
Effectiveness: 91 to 99 percent. The progestin-only pills, however, must be taken at the same time every day in order to be effective. Planned Parenthood notes that certain supplements and medicines, including St. John's Wort, can render the pill less effective. And vomiting and diarrhea can also keep it from working.
STD Protection: None.

Levonogestrel pills

"What it is: Basically a high concentrated form of hormones taken after sex to prevent pregnancy. How it works: Like the other hormonal birth controls, it works by inhibiting ovulation up to five days after unprotected sex. However, if you happen to have ovulated (most women don't know when exactly they're ovulating) before you get to the emergency pill, it's less likely to work.

Effectiveness: Levonogestrel pills (Plan B One-Step and Next Choice One Dose) are up to 89 percent effective when taken within three days after sex, and Ella is 85 percent effective taken within five days after sex.
STD Protection: None.

Emergency Contraception

What it is: Basically a high concentrated form of hormones taken after sex to prevent pregnancy. 

How it works: Like the other hormonal birth controls, it works by inhibiting ovulation up to five days after unprotected sex. However, if you happen to have ovulated (most women don't know when exactly they're ovulating) before you get to the emergency pill, it's less likely to work.

Effectiveness: Levonogestrel pills (Plan B One-Step and Next Choice One Dose) are up to 89 percent effective when taken within three days after sex, and Ella is 85 percent effective taken within five days after sex.

STD Protection: None.

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